Pete wanted to see the beaches of Normandy, France, site of the D-Day landings by the Allied forces on June 6, 1944. Viking River Cruises took us there. We visited the D-Day Museum at Arromanches, where you can see the remains of the breakwater off shore, the German bunkers in the field at Longues sur Mer, east of Omaha Beach, the American Military Cemetery at Colleville sur Mer, and Omaha beach. There are four other similar beaches where the Allies landed: Juno, Gold, Utah, and Sword. It was a very moving experience to be at the place where the largest invasion took place and where so many young people died.

Remains of a fabricated harbor breakwater, towed across the English Channel in 1944.

Remains of a fabricated harbor breakwater, towed across the English Channel in 1944.

Entrance to D-Day Museum at Arromanches

Entrance to D-Day Museum at Arromanches

Cemetery where almost 1,000 are buried. Those who died were so young.

Cemetery where almost 1,000 Americans are buried. Those who died were so young.

German bunkers

German bunkers

At the American cemetery there was a thoughtful memorial ceremony after which we were given long-stem roses to place on any grace we wished.

At the American cemetery there was a thoughtful memorial ceremony after which we were given long-stem roses to place on any grave we wished.

I apologize that I don't know the name of the artist who made this painting of D-Day.

I apologize that I don’t know the name of the artist who made this painting of D-Day.

Pete at Omaha Beach where his Uncle Lee might have landed with supplies, two weeks behind the front lines.

Pete at Omaha Beach where his Uncle Lee might have landed with supplies, two weeks behind the front lines.

Omaha Beach at low tide, long and wide.

Omaha Beach at low tide, long and wide.

Sculpture at Omaha Beach

Sculpture at Omaha Beach

Memorial and reflecting pool at the American Cemetery

Memorial and reflecting pool at the American Cemetery

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